Archive for the ‘YouTube’ Category

Mobile Marketing : Apple – iPhone – A Guided Tour

juillet 5, 2007

It’s available…

iPhone review is coming… stay connected… 😉

Aplle Apple – iPhone – A Guided Tour

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Verizon exclusivity ends, YouTube Mobile opens the gates – Mobile Marketing

juin 18, 2007

Alright, everyone go quit your jobs and pick up second (and third) batteries for your handsets: YouTube Mobile has gone live.

As previously reported, YouTube was apparently merely biding its time while Verizon’s exclusivity deal ran its course before flipping the switch, so now we can all enjoy several hundred editor’s picks — the supposed cream of the YouTube crop — in mobile-friendly 3GP format (though word has it they’re eventually planning a full mobile implementation).

Initial testing on our Nokia N76 review unit suggests that 3G data is highly recommended, but we somehow suspect we’ll still manage to sink our productivity to record lows even on crappy EDGE. Hit up m.youtube.com to check it out; we’ll be on the couch with our eyes glued to our phones if you need us.

http://m.youtube.com

Verizon exclusivity ends, YouTube Mobile opens the gates – Engadget Mobile

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MySpace : We’ll Crush YouTube

octobre 18, 2006

News Corp. chief operating officer Peter Chernin told investors at an industry conference today that since much of YouTube’s traffic comes from MySpace, it’s time to cut out the middle man. Chernin estimated that around 60-70% of YouTube’s traffic comes from MySpace, and as a result he wants to ramp up MySpace Video, giving users less incentive to look elsewhere. But while the 60% figure might not be totally accurate, MySpace is definitely a catalyst for YouTube’s growth – they actually reported a dip in traffic when MySpace temporarily disabled YouTube embeds at the end of 2005 (they were forced to allow them again after a user revolt).

But it’s not just YouTube – Chernin expressed distaste for all the services that are feeding the MySpace beast: “If you look at virtually any Web 2.0 application, whether its YouTube, whether it’s Flickr, whether it’s Photobucket…almost all of them are really driven off the back of MySpace, there’s no reason why we can’t build a parallel business.” While I’m not convinced that Flickr gained success on the back of MySpace, Photobucket almost certainly did – ImageShack isn’t mentioned, but it also owes much of its success to America’s leading social network.

The sentiments indicate a very worrying trend: MySpace has stated its intention to clone the best tools, and Chermin believes that MySpace can equal or better the third party tools with in-house products. This is such a ridiculous strategy that it’s not even worth contemplating. MySpace’s openness to third party extensions (MySpace layouts, MySpace codes) is one of its most popular attributes – squashing that ecosystem may provide short term benefits, but it will ultimately harm them in the long term.

Chernin’s sentiments also confirm our assumptions about the recent MySpace update, a reaction to the Flash-based MySpace hack which had the side effect of breaking many MySpace add-ons. With absolutely warning for developers, it was assumed that MySpace simply didn’t care about the problem – an opinion that was confirmed today. Incidentally, Robert Yeager at Cooqy just emailed me to say he has once again found a workaround to the issue, one that will only be broken if MySpace bans external widgets altogether – for some, it’s not all that hard to imagine.

However, the statement runs counter to MySpace’s recent move to sell tracks through MySpace Music: in that instance, they chose to partner with Snocap on their MySpace music player, rather than crushing the startup. The picture is not so clear with the new MySpace slideshows widget – some of my sources claim that it was developed by the folks at Slide, while others think it was created by MySpace itself.

There are literally thousands external tools plugging in to MySpace these days – among them BubbleSnaps’ picture generator, Finetune’s music player, Trakzor’s MySpace tracker, MyChingo’s audio comments tool, Snapvine’s voice comments widget, PollPub’s MySpace polls, EQO’s MySpace message boards and many more besides. All of these widgets work on other networks, but the truth is that MySpace accounts for the majority of their users. As mentioned hundreds of times on Mashable, the top sites for widget embeds include Xanga, Piczo, hi5, Blogger and Windows Live Spaces, but all of these sites added together couldn’t equal the market provided by the MySpace beast. Even so, it seems that the web’s future will be widgetized, whether MySpace play the game or not.

MySpace: We’ll Crush YouTube – Mashable!

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YouTube serving 100 million videos a day

octobre 16, 2006

Video sharing site YouTube, which was acquired by Google earlier this week, is now serving a staggering 100 million videos a day.

Statistics released by web monitoring firm comScore show that YouTube served an average of 100 million video streams a day during July.

The site was visited by 63 million people aged 15 and over during the month, with an average of 6.2 million users a day. YouTube was the 17th most visited site worldwide for the month.

YouTube served nearly three billion video streams worldwide in July, representing slightly less than a quarter of the total activity streamed to US locations.

On an average daily basis for the month, 96 million streams were served worldwide and 21 million in the US.

« Several media outlets have reported that YouTube streamed 100 million videos daily in July, and the results of our recent study corroborate this report, » said Gian Fulgoni, chairman of comScore Networks.

« In fact, our daily streaming data shows that YouTube first surpassed the 100 million threshold on 17 July, which coincides with YouTube’s own announcement that it had reached this impressive mark.

« Our streaming data covering more recent months will be published shortly, and will show that YouTube’s streaming total now far surpasses 100 million per day. »

Google agreed to acquire YouTube for $1.65bn in stock earlier this week. YouTube will continue to operate independently, and will keep its own headquarters and employees.

YouTube serving 100 million videos a day – vnunet.com

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Google agreed to pay $1.65 billion in stock for YouTube – Video Message from Chad and Steve

octobre 11, 2006

A profitless Web site started by three 20-somethings after a late-night dinner party is sold for more than a billion dollars, instantly turning dozens of its employees into paper millionaires. It sounds like a tale from the late 1990’s dot-com bubble, but it happened yesterday.

First a Message from Chad and Steve 😉

Google, the online search behemoth, agreed yesterday to pay $1.65 billion in stock for the Web site that came out of that party — YouTube, the video-sharing phenomenon that is the darling of an Internet resurgence known as Web 2.0.

YouTube had been coveted by virtually every big media and technology company, as they seek to tap into a generation of consumers who are viewing 100 million short videos on the site every day. Google is expected to try to make money from YouTube by integrating the site with its search technology and search-based advertising program.

But the purchase price has also invited comparisons to the mind-boggling valuations that were once given to dozens of Silicon Valley companies a decade ago. Like YouTube, those companies were once the Next Big Thing, but some soon folded.

Google, with a market value of $132 billion, can clearly afford to take a gamble with YouTube, but the question remains: How to put a price tag on an unproven business?

“If you believe it’s the future of television, it’s clearly worth $1.6 billion,” Steven A. Ballmer, Microsoft’s chief executive, said of YouTube. “If you believe something else, you could write down maybe it’s not worth much at all.”

In a conference call to announce the transaction yesterday, there were eerie echoes of the late 1990’s boom time. There was no mention of what measures Google used to arrive at the price it agreed to pay. At one point, Google’s vice president, David Drummond, gave a cryptic explanation: “We modeled this on a more or less synergistic kind of model. You can imagine this would be hard to do on a stand-alone basis.”

The price tag Google paid may simply have been the cost of beating its rivals — Yahoo, Viacom and the News Corporation — to take control of the most sought-after Web site of the moment. It was also perhaps the only price that two YouTube founders, Chad Hurley, 29, and Steven Chen, 28, and their big venture capital backer, Sequoia Capital Partners, were willing to accept, given that they most likely could have continued as an independent company. A third YouTube founder, Jawed Karim, left the company to pursue an advanced degree at Stanford.

The deal came together in a matter of days. After rebuffing a series of other overtures, YouTube’s founders decided to have lunch on Wednesday with Google’s co-founder, Larry Page, and its chief executive, Eric E. Schmidt. The idea of a deal had been broached a few days earlier. The setting was classic Silicon Valley start-up: a booth at Denny’s near YouTube’s headquarters in San Bruno, Calif. The Google executives threw out an offer of $1.6 billion and autonomy to continue running the business.

That set off a marathon of meetings and conference calls over the next two days, which kicked into even higher gear on Friday, when news of the talks began to circulate, putting pressure on Google to sign a deal before a rival bid emerged. In fact, the News Corporation sent a letter to YouTube seeking to start talks but never received a response.

Dot-Com Boom Echoed in Deal to Buy YouTube – New York Times

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